N.ae.d.A. bean

A home for my heart and mind;
thedailywhat:

NYU Student Accidentally E-mails 40,000 Students with “Reply All,” A Wildfire of Lulz Ensues

New York University sophomore student Max Wiseltier started a wildfire of lulz yesterday when he accidentally hit “reply all” to a school-wide bulletin e-mail that was only meant to be forwarded to his mother. Triggered by the University’s archaic Listerv system, Wiseltier’s message was sent to nearly 40,000 other students in the mailing list, many of whom didn’t hesitate to have a little fun with their discovery of the “reply all” feature. For more hilarious screencaps, head over to BuzzFeed!

thedailywhat:

NYU Student Accidentally E-mails 40,000 Students with “Reply All,” A Wildfire of Lulz Ensues

tortillapower:fuckyeahmarxismleninism:


++ PLEASE SHARE FAR AND WIDE ++an artistic collabo btwn street inc media and rodolfo ( young student at youthbuild CRCD)this is what institutional oppression looks like.we need justice in the justice system!!” 80 % of the people locked up in the Los Angeles County Jails are BLACK & LATINO “ JOIN THE MOVEMENT TO END SHERIFF VIOLENCE IN L.A. JAILS! PLEASE SUPPORT, LIKE THE COALITION’S PAGE& PLS LIKE OUR PAGE TOO#endsheriffviolence #reduceLAjailpop #riseofthedandelions #ourpeoplearemedicine


also:
The Top 10 Most Startling Facts About People of Color and Criminal Justice in the United States
A Look at the Racial Disparities Inherent in Our Nation’s Criminal-Justice System
This month the United States celebrates the Selma-to-Montgomery marches of 1965 to commemorate our shared history of the civil rights movement and our nation’s continued progress towards racial equality. Yet decades later a broken criminal-justice system has proven that we still have a long way to go in achieving racial equality.
Today people of color continue to be disproportionately incarcerated, policed, and sentenced to death at significantly higher rates than their white counterparts. Further, racial disparities in the criminal-justice system threaten communities of color—disenfranchising thousands by limiting voting rights and denying equal access to employment, housing, public benefits, and education to millions more. In light of these disparities, it is imperative that criminal-justice reform evolves as the civil rights issue of the 21st century.
Below we outline the top 10 facts pertaining to the criminal-justice system’s impact on communities of color.
1. While people of color make up about 30 percent of the United States’ population, they account for 60 percent of those imprisoned. The prison population grew by 700 percent from 1970 to 2005, a rate that is outpacing crime and population rates. The incarceration rates disproportionately impact men of color: 1 in every 15 African American men and 1 in every 36 Hispanic men are incarcerated in comparison to 1 in every 106 white men.
2. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, one in three black men can expect to go to prison in their lifetime. Individuals of color have a disproportionate number of encounters with law enforcement, indicating that racial profiling continues to be a problem. A report by the Department of Justice found that blacks and Hispanics were approximately three times more likely to be searched during a traffic stop than white motorists. African Americans were twice as likely to be arrested and almost four times as likely to experience the use of force during encounters with the police.
3. Students of color face harsher punishments in school than their white peers, leading to a higher number of youth of color incarcerated. Black and Hispanic students represent more than 70 percent of those involved in school-related arrests or referrals to law enforcement. Currently, African Americans make up two-fifths and Hispanics one-fifth of confined youth today.
4. According to recent data by the Department of Education, African American students are arrested far more often than their white classmates. The data showed that 96,000 students were arrested and 242,000 referred to law enforcement by schools during the 2009-10 school year. Of those students, black and Hispanic students made up more than 70 percent of arrested or referred students. Harsh school punishments, from suspensions to arrests, have led to high numbers of youth of color coming into contact with the juvenile-justice system and at an earlier age.
5. African American youth have higher rates of juvenile incarceration and are more likely to be sentenced to adult prison. According to the Sentencing Project, even though African American juvenile youth are about 16 percent of the youth population, 37 percent of their cases are moved to criminal court and 58 percent of African American youth are sent to adult prisons.
6. As the number of women incarcerated has increased by 800 percent over the last three decades, women of color have been disproportionately represented. While the number of women incarcerated is relatively low, the racial and ethnic disparities are startling. African American women are three times more likely than white women to be incarcerated, while Hispanic women are 69 percent more likely than white women to be incarcerated.
7. The war on drugs has been waged primarily in communities of color where people of color are more likely to receive higher offenses. According to the Human Rights Watch, people of color are no more likely to use or sell illegal drugs than whites, but they have higher rate of arrests. African Americans comprise 14 percent of regular drug users but are 37 percent of those arrested for drug offenses. From 1980 to 2007 about one in three of the 25.4 million adults arrested for drugs was African American.
8. Once convicted, black offenders receive longer sentences compared to white offenders. The U.S. Sentencing Commission stated that in the federal system black offenders receive sentences that are 10 percent longer than white offenders for the same crimes. The Sentencing Project reports that African Americans are 21 percent more likely to receive mandatory-minimum sentences than white defendants and are 20 percent more like to be sentenced to prison.
9. Voter laws that prohibit people with felony convictions to vote disproportionately impact men of color. An estimated 5.3 million Americans are denied the right to vote based on a past felony conviction. Felony disenfranchisement is exaggerated by racial disparities in the criminal-justice system, ultimately denying 13 percent of African American men the right to vote. Felony-disenfranchisement policies have led to 11 states denying the right to vote to more than 10 percent of their African American population.
10. Studies have shown that people of color face disparities in wage trajectory following release from prison. Evidence shows that spending time in prison affects wage trajectories with a disproportionate impact on black men and women. The results show no evidence of racial divergence in wages prior to incarceration; however, following release from prison, wages grow at a 21 percent slower rate for black former inmates compared to white ex-convicts. A number of states have bans on people with certain convictions working in domestic health-service industries such as nursing, child care, and home health care—areas in which many poor women and women of color are disproportionately concentrated.
Theses racial disparities have deprived people of color of their most basic civil rights, making criminal-justice reform the civil rights issue of our time. Through mass imprisonment and the overrepresentation of individuals of color within the criminal justice and prison system, people of color have experienced an adverse impact on themselves and on their communities from barriers to reintegrating into society to engaging in the democratic process. Eliminating the racial disparities inherent to our nation’s criminal-justice policies and practices must be at the heart of a renewed, refocused, and reenergized movement for racial justice in America.
There have been a number of initiatives on the state and federal level to address the racial disparities in youth incarceration. Last summer Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced the Schools Discipline Initiative to bring increased awareness of effective policies and practices to ultimately dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline. States like California and Massachusetts are considering legislation to address the disproportionate suspensions among students of color. And in Clayton County, Georgia, collaborative local reforms have resulted in a 47 percent reduction in juvenile-court referrals and a 51 percent decrease in juvenile felony rates. These initiatives could serve as models of success for lessening the disparities in incarceration rates.
Sophia Kerby is the Special Assistant for Progress 2050 at American Progress.

tortillapower:fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

++ PLEASE SHARE FAR AND WIDE ++

an artistic collabo btwn street inc media and rodolfo ( young student at youthbuild CRCD)

this is what institutional oppression looks like.
we need justice in the justice system!!

” 80 % of the people locked up in the Los Angeles County Jails are BLACK & LATINO “ 

JOIN THE MOVEMENT TO END SHERIFF VIOLENCE IN L.A. JAILS! 

PLEASE SUPPORT, LIKE THE COALITION’S PAGE

& PLS LIKE OUR PAGE TOO

#endsheriffviolence #reduceLAjailpop #riseofthedandelions #ourpeoplearemedicine

also:

The Top 10 Most Startling Facts About People of Color and Criminal Justice in the United States

A Look at the Racial Disparities Inherent in Our Nation’s Criminal-Justice System


This month the United States celebrates the Selma-to-Montgomery marches of 1965 to commemorate our shared history of the civil rights movement and our nation’s continued progress towards racial equality. Yet decades later a broken criminal-justice system has proven that we still have a long way to go in achieving racial equality.

Today people of color continue to be disproportionately incarcerated, policed, and sentenced to death at significantly higher rates than their white counterparts. Further, racial disparities in the criminal-justice system threaten communities of color—disenfranchising thousands by limiting voting rights and denying equal access to employment, housing, public benefits, and education to millions more. In light of these disparities, it is imperative that criminal-justice reform evolves as the civil rights issue of the 21st century.

Below we outline the top 10 facts pertaining to the criminal-justice system’s impact on communities of color.

1. While people of color make up about 30 percent of the United States’ population, they account for 60 percent of those imprisoned. The prison population grew by 700 percent from 1970 to 2005, a rate that is outpacing crime and population rates. The incarceration rates disproportionately impact men of color: 1 in every 15 African American men and 1 in every 36 Hispanic men are incarcerated in comparison to 1 in every 106 white men.

2. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, one in three black men can expect to go to prison in their lifetime. Individuals of color have a disproportionate number of encounters with law enforcement, indicating that racial profiling continues to be a problem. A report by the Department of Justice found that blacks and Hispanics were approximately three times more likely to be searched during a traffic stop than white motorists. African Americans were twice as likely to be arrested and almost four times as likely to experience the use of force during encounters with the police.

3. Students of color face harsher punishments in school than their white peers, leading to a higher number of youth of color incarcerated. Black and Hispanic students represent more than 70 percent of those involved in school-related arrests or referrals to law enforcement. Currently, African Americans make up two-fifths and Hispanics one-fifth of confined youth today.

4. According to recent data by the Department of Education, African American students are arrested far more often than their white classmates. The data showed that 96,000 students were arrested and 242,000 referred to law enforcement by schools during the 2009-10 school year. Of those students, black and Hispanic students made up more than 70 percent of arrested or referred students. Harsh school punishments, from suspensions to arrests, have led to high numbers of youth of color coming into contact with the juvenile-justice system and at an earlier age.

5. African American youth have higher rates of juvenile incarceration and are more likely to be sentenced to adult prison. According to the Sentencing Project, even though African American juvenile youth are about 16 percent of the youth population, 37 percent of their cases are moved to criminal court and 58 percent of African American youth are sent to adult prisons.

6. As the number of women incarcerated has increased by 800 percent over the last three decades, women of color have been disproportionately represented. While the number of women incarcerated is relatively low, the racial and ethnic disparities are startling. African American women are three times more likely than white women to be incarcerated, while Hispanic women are 69 percent more likely than white women to be incarcerated.

7. The war on drugs has been waged primarily in communities of color where people of color are more likely to receive higher offenses. According to the Human Rights Watch, people of color are no more likely to use or sell illegal drugs than whites, but they have higher rate of arrests. African Americans comprise 14 percent of regular drug users but are 37 percent of those arrested for drug offenses. From 1980 to 2007 about one in three of the 25.4 million adults arrested for drugs was African American.

8. Once convicted, black offenders receive longer sentences compared to white offenders. The U.S. Sentencing Commission stated that in the federal system black offenders receive sentences that are 10 percent longer than white offenders for the same crimes. The Sentencing Project reports that African Americans are 21 percent more likely to receive mandatory-minimum sentences than white defendants and are 20 percent more like to be sentenced to prison.

9. Voter laws that prohibit people with felony convictions to vote disproportionately impact men of color. An estimated 5.3 million Americans are denied the right to vote based on a past felony conviction. Felony disenfranchisement is exaggerated by racial disparities in the criminal-justice system, ultimately denying 13 percent of African American men the right to vote. Felony-disenfranchisement policies have led to 11 states denying the right to vote to more than 10 percent of their African American population.

10. Studies have shown that people of color face disparities in wage trajectory following release from prison. Evidence shows that spending time in prison affects wage trajectories with a disproportionate impact on black men and women. The results show no evidence of racial divergence in wages prior to incarceration; however, following release from prison, wages grow at a 21 percent slower rate for black former inmates compared to white ex-convicts. A number of states have bans on people with certain convictions working in domestic health-service industries such as nursing, child care, and home health care—areas in which many poor women and women of color are disproportionately concentrated.

Theses racial disparities have deprived people of color of their most basic civil rights, making criminal-justice reform the civil rights issue of our time. Through mass imprisonment and the overrepresentation of individuals of color within the criminal justice and prison system, people of color have experienced an adverse impact on themselves and on their communities from barriers to reintegrating into society to engaging in the democratic process. Eliminating the racial disparities inherent to our nation’s criminal-justice policies and practices must be at the heart of a renewed, refocused, and reenergized movement for racial justice in America.

There have been a number of initiatives on the state and federal level to address the racial disparities in youth incarceration. Last summer Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced the Schools Discipline Initiative to bring increased awareness of effective policies and practices to ultimately dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline. States like California and Massachusetts are considering legislation to address the disproportionate suspensions among students of color. And in Clayton County, Georgia, collaborative local reforms have resulted in a 47 percent reduction in juvenile-court referrals and a 51 percent decrease in juvenile felony rates. These initiatives could serve as models of success for lessening the disparities in incarceration rates.

Sophia Kerby is the Special Assistant for Progress 2050 at American Progress.

(via downlo)

Two juxtaposed Water-Invoking pentagrams. One invokes erect, the other, averse. This generates a correspondence to the Ten of Cups in the Tarot. The center is marked to denote “satisfaction of the innermost.” The adverse invokes self-love, the erect, love of others. Both combined generate great emotional wealth.

Two juxtaposed Water-Invoking pentagrams. One invokes erect, the other, averse. This generates a correspondence to the Ten of Cups in the Tarot. The center is marked to denote “satisfaction of the innermost.” The adverse invokes self-love, the erect, love of others. Both combined generate great emotional wealth.

downlo:

afightforloveandglory:

team-joebama:

team-joebama:

is that a fuckin CVS
of course Mitt Romney is standing right in front of the hair care aisle

oh my god I just remembered that Honey Nut Cheerios is like his comfort food
why that ever came up in election coverage, I don’t know, but it totally did and he’s about to walk out with two boxes for himself
i hope this isn’t a midnight shame-snack-run to CVS 

I’m having a really strange obsession with pictures of Mittens post election.

Me too. Seriously, though: why isn’t there a Tumblr for these sad Romney pictures?

Ah, Don’t I see that sincere facade? Yeah, Ha, Wow, Ha—surely Mitt’s cat like facial reflexes twitched into this form (“trust me” #2) when his PR senses began to tingle. Sadly, as you can see, he is looking PAST the photographer. This is bad. All it conveys now is: “Trust me, voter, I’m gonna get stoned and nom the fuck out these cherrios.” I think “I’m a Good Guy” #8 would have been more appropriate.

downlo:

afightforloveandglory:

team-joebama:

team-joebama:

is that a fuckin CVS

of course Mitt Romney is standing right in front of the hair care aisle

oh my god I just remembered that Honey Nut Cheerios is like his comfort food

why that ever came up in election coverage, I don’t know, but it totally did and he’s about to walk out with two boxes for himself

i hope this isn’t a midnight shame-snack-run to CVS 

I’m having a really strange obsession with pictures of Mittens post election.

Me too. Seriously, though: why isn’t there a Tumblr for these sad Romney pictures?

Ah, Don’t I see that sincere facade? Yeah, Ha, Wow, Ha—surely Mitt’s cat like facial reflexes twitched into this form (“trust me” #2) when his PR senses began to tingle. Sadly, as you can see, he is looking PAST the photographer. This is bad. All it conveys now is: “Trust me, voter, I’m gonna get stoned and nom the fuck out these cherrios.” I think “I’m a Good Guy” #8 would have been more appropriate.

(Source: asssquake)

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

‘Folk-tales of Bengal’ by the Rev. Lal Behari Day; with 32 illustrations in colour by Warwick Goble. Published 1912 by Macmillan & Co, London.

See the complete book here.

(via downlo)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Dhaka, Bangladesh: The Socialist Workers’ Front and other activists demand reform of factory fire codes and punishment for the bosses responsible in the deaths of more than 110 garment workers in Saturday’s inferno, November 27, 2012.

Photos by Mean Sazu

uutpoetry:

Facebook is No Place for Life

This bag contains espresso, not coffee,
and it has a hole in it.
This book of postmodern poetry has fallen over.
The FedEx man’s reflective vest is so yellow,
neon yellow, even more so on a cloudy day
of overexposed, grey air.

A man whose last name is a basic tool
is trying to explain to me how poetry works.
His middle initial is Z.

This collection of statements is somehow
in the process of investigating itself
and becoming aware of its own weight.

Poor us, stuck in the fiction of
our own lives. This time the mansion
will not say, “Oh yes, take my windows,
take my chandeliers and ride out the night
in majestic abraxas.”

Instead, we will be left alone
under the footprints of
furry animals
stuck in the world
with alien blood.

uutpoetry:

Facebook is No Place for Life

This bag contains espresso, not coffee,
and it has a hole in it.
This book of postmodern poetry has fallen over.
The FedEx man’s reflective vest is so yellow,
neon yellow, even more so on a cloudy day
of overexposed, grey air.

A man whose last name is a basic tool
is trying to explain to me how poetry works.
His middle initial is Z.

This collection of statements is somehow
in the process of investigating itself
and becoming aware of its own weight.

Poor us, stuck in the fiction of
our own lives. This time the mansion
will not say, “Oh yes, take my windows,
take my chandeliers and ride out the night
in majestic abraxas.”

Instead, we will be left alone
under the footprints of
furry animals
stuck in the world
with alien blood.